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This lovely recipe for Homemade Raspberry Jam has been passed down through the generations in my family. My late Grandma Barb could make it more perfectly and delicious than anyone I know. Her method is a little bit different than the recipe and instructions found on any pectin container I’ve come across, but Grandma’s method stands the test of time.

It has a fabulous texture and is delicious on toast, scones, hot bread or rolls…or even just in your standard PB&J.

Let me show you how to make it happen.

Make sure to wash and dry your jars, lids and rings in hot soapy water, making sure they are thoroughly rinsed.

Heat a small sauce pan of water to a boil, remove from the heat and add your lids and rings. This will help the lids seal a bit faster when they are placed on the jars. Just a note about the lids and rings. You can reuse the rings, but not the lids. They only seal once.

Measure out your sugar into a large bowl.

Place your fresh raspberries into a large pot. (Only have frozen berries? See this post HOW TO MAKE JAM FROM FROZEN BERRIES). No need to crush them at all. They will break down naturally for you as they heat through.

Grab your pectin and sprinkle it over the top of the berries. Add just a bit of butter as well, this will help it keep from foaming.

Turn the heat to high and stir it as it heats up. Bring it to a rolling boil, meaning a boil that continues to bubble even when you are stirring it.

Add your sugar and keep on stirring. Bring it back to a rolling boil, then once achieved let it boil hard for 1 minute.

Remove from the heat and pour half of the mixture into a large glass measuring cup. Using a pourable glass measuring cup will make for an easier time getting the jam into the jars. You can also use a ladle or if you are particularly coordinated you could even pour it from the pan. In my experience, the glass measuring cup works best.

Carefully pour the hot jam into pint or half-pint jars. Wet a paper towel and clean off the rim of the jar, making sure there isn’t any jam sticking.

Immediately place the dried lids and rings onto the jar and twist closed. You want to act quickly here, and do it while the jam is nice and hot. It will seal a lot better for you, if you do.

Process your jam in a Water Bath Canner. You can read about how to do that HERE.

Now, I haven’t ever had any trouble with my lids sealing shut without processing them in the canner, however I know that many people feel the jam will stay preserved longer if the jars are processed. You can read about how to do that HERE. Note that the picture above is from years ago when I was working on a post about Homemade Apricot Jam. 🙂

You want to give a listen as the jars cool on your counter. When you hear a popping sound, that jar has sealed shut. After 24 hours, you can test the jars by slightly pressing on the centers. If they are firm and don’t give at all, the jars have sealed.

I hope you get a chance to try it!

Homemade Raspberry Jam

Print
Serves: 8 half pint jars or 4 pint jars Prep Time: Cooking Time:
Nutrition facts: 200 calories 20 grams fat
Rating: 5.0/5
( 1 voted )

Ingredients

  • 5 (6 oz) containers fresh raspberries (about 8 cups of berries)
  • 1 (1.7 oz) box Sure Jell fruit pectin
  • 1/2 tsp butter
  • 6 1/2 C sugar
  • Equipment:
  • 4 pint jars, or 8 half pint jars
  • new lids
  • rings
  • water bath canner

Instructions

  1. Wash and dry your jars, lids and rings in hot soapy water, making sure they are thoroughly rinsed.
  2. Heat a small sauce pan of water to a boil, remove from the heat and add your lids and rings. This will help the lids seal a bit faster when they are placed on the jars. Just a note about the lids and rings. You can reuse the rings, but not the lids. They only seal once.
  3. Measure out your sugar into a large bowl.
  4. Place your fresh raspberries into a large pot. (Only have frozen berries? See this post HOW TO MAKE JAM FROM FROZEN BERRIES). No need to crush them at all. They will break down naturally for you as they heat through.
  5. Grab your pectin and sprinkle it over the top of the berries. Add just a bit of butter as well, this will help it keep from foaming.
  6. Turn the heat to high and stir it as the mixture heats up. Bring it to a rolling boil, meaning a boil that continues to bubble even when you are stirring it.
  7. Add your sugar and keep on stirring. Bring it back to a rolling boil, then once achieved let it boil hard for 1 minute.
  8. Remove from the heat and pour half of the mixture into a large glass measuring cup. Using a pourable glass measuring cup will make for an easier time getting the jam into the jars. You can also use a ladle or if you are particularly coordinated you could even pour it from the pan. In my experience, the glass measuring cup works best.
  9. Carefully pour the hot jam into pint or half-pint jars. Wet a paper towel and clean off the rim of the jar, making sure there isn't any jam sticking.
  10. Immediately place the dried lids and rings onto the jar and twist closed. You want to act quickly here, and do it while the jam is nice and hot. It will seal a lot better for you, if you do.
  11. Process your jam in a Water Bath Canner. You can read about how to do that HERE. Now, I haven't ever had any trouble with my lids sealing shut without processing them in the canner, however I know that many people feel the jam will stay preserved longer if the jars are processed.
  12. You want to give a listen as the jars cool on your counter. When you hear a popping sound, that jar has sealed shut. After 24 hours, you can test the jars by slightly pressing on the centers. If they are firm and don't give at all, the jars have sealed.
  13. Store in a cool dry place for up to 12 months. Once each jar is opened it should be kept in the fridge. 
Recipe from my Grandma, Barbara Hunter

About Jamie

Thanks for dropping by today! I hope you find these recipes to be delicious!

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